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UpdatesMar 13, 2014

Working at heights: how to reduce the risk of falls from heights

After Tuesday’s Health & Safety Bulletin which looked at some surprising statistics found regarding work-related injuries caused by falling from a height, today we have some information for you about when a fall risk may exist and some ways that you can reduce those risks.

By Joanna Weekes

After Tuesday’s Health & Safety Bulletin which looked at some surprising statistics found regarding work-related injuries caused by falling from a height, today we have some information for you about when a fall risk may exist and some ways that you can reduce those risks.

Working at heights refers to any circumstance in which a person is exposed to a fall risk. Fall risks occur in many situations, but some common examples of fall risks include the following:

Remember, even if it is not a regular occurrence or part of the inherent role of the worker to work from heights, a worker can still be exposed to a risk of falling and since they do not perform the task regularly, the appropriate control measures may not be in place. Do not let this happen. Workers who change a light globe in an office, access high storage areas in the stationery cupboard or change outdoor display signs are all at fall risks.

Methods of controlling fall risks include:

Another hazard associated with a worker working from a height is the risk that a person or object will fall and hit another worker below – so take that into account when you conduct your risk assessment as well, e.g. whether the workers are using tools that are unsecured and could be dropped from a height.

So make sure that you consider ALL circumstances where your workers may be at a fall risk – because you don’t want to become one of the statistics.

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Lexie Kiel Dela Cruz
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